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Jerry Reinert '56 Portrait

Speed painter Dale Henry created this portrait of Jerry Reinert ’56

1955

Richard Williams passed away in January. He had an early start to his career in the metallurgical industry. After freshman year at RPI, he was introduced to the president of Consolidated Industries, a company that forged aluminum alloys for aircraft. By his junior year, he was solving the challenges it faced with improperly heat-treated parts. After graduation, he worked for Anaconda American Brass, rising to plant manager at several plants. He was happy with his career and credited it to his time spent at RPI. He also spent many years as a scoutmaster and as an executive board member of area councils. Posted 2021-09-29
Rick Setlowe is featured in a wonderful narration at the USS Midway Museum in San Diego about his experiences on the Midway during the 1962 China/Quemoy crisis. Recorded during the shut-in times of 2020, it shows Rick a long way from his last haircut but with vivid recall of the dangerous nuclear threat. Posted 2021-09-29
Willy Lick has been expanding his interest in painting. “I’ve been trying to learn about oil painting for several years. As part of that, I got interested in color, not only as part of a painting, but also the science of color,” he says. “I tried to answer a few simple questions, such as: ‘What are primary colors?’ and ‘What is the mechanism by which the human eye can see all the colors that it does?’” After having much trouble finding answers to these two questions in books on art, color technology, and physics, Willy has written his own treatise on the subject. Those interested may contact him at willy@ucsb.edu. Meanwhile, he continues to be an active painter, holding art gallery exhibitions in Santa Barbara. Posted 2021-09-29
Larry Kashar is still doing professional work. For years, he has worked as an expert witness on forensic metallurgical cases. “I’m still theoretically somewhat employed, still retained on three cases. But it’s very slow now with the pandemic. How can you inspect a laboratory when no one is allowed in? How can they seat a jury? I get copies of discovery documents, which are really good sleep inducers,” he says. Larry has been battling prostate cancer and is enrolled in the trial of a new drug. “It’s stopped the growth, and it’s fortunately covered by insurance.” He and his wife, Barbara, are active supporters of a local Los Angeles symphony orchestra now presenting virtual recitals. “I’ve become almost competent on Zoom.” Posted 2021-09-29
Jim Ingle has lived on the New Jersey shore, in the same four-bedroom house, for 60 years. He and his wife, Audrey, plan to move to a retirement community as soon as the pandemic situation permits. Over the years, he has enjoyed surf swimming in the ocean. “But we couldn’t surf swim last summer. Also, I’m running out of energy,” he says. Jim keeps in touch with several Theta Xi fraternity brothers, including Bill Taubert, who lives in Nevada; Lloyd Bauer, who divides his time between Florida and Germany; and Dick Maher, who lives in California. Sadly, the Napa Valley fires destroyed the homes of Dick and his two sons. All three households escaped unhurt with only minutes to spare. Posted 2021-09-29
Thomas Hill still divides his time between homes in upper New York state and Orlando, Florida. Trouble with macular degeneration forced him to sell his New York farm in 2014 and purchase another residence in nearby Cato. He still has hunting privileges on his old farm. “I pretend I’m hunting. I don’t have the stamina anymore,” he says. Tom marvels at the pace of construction in Florida — 72 new developments in the state in 2020. He enjoys a rare golf outing in the pandemic era. “We don’t care about the score. Just try to hit the ball as well as you can.” Tom recently reconnected by phone with his old roommate, Connie Bassilakis. Posted 2021-09-29
John Cummings was cofounder and chief executive officer of Comptek Research, a defense electronics business that he sold in 1999 to Northrup Grumman. Now in Sedona, Arizona, he and his wife, Barbara, celebrated his 88th birthday with a two-week trip to Hawaii. Posted 2021-09-29
Bob Bozzone continues to serve as an emeritus trustee on the Carnegie Museum Board and its Investment Committee. Over the years, he has been a Rensselaer trustee, chairman of the Federal Reserve Board in Pittsburgh, a board member of the Science Center, a major supporter of Catholic schools, and an advisory board member of the Salvation Army. “I fell in love with the Salvation Army; I try to be there for them,” he says. Bob says that his 10 grandchildren keep him going. Posted 2021-09-29
Ted Baglin qualifies as the class’ senior member, having started out in the Class of 1951. “After freshman year, the dean said it would be a good idea to take some time off,” he says. Following four years in the Navy, he returned to graduate. Then came an adventurous bachelor life — where Ted worked as a contract engineer in aerospace, worked at ski resorts, climbed to the base camp of Mount Everest, started scuba diving at age 70, and attended widespread diving trips. Ted lives with his widowed sister in Northern California, with her daughter and family nearby. He swims daily and keeps in touch with some classmates, including Erv Reschke. Posted 2021-09-29
Rajai Atalla still operates his own research company in Wisconsin, though at age 86, he is considering selling. His firm works on corn ethanol and develops enzymes to convert cellulose to sugar and eventual fermentation to ethanol. Rajai and his wife enjoy life in a church-affiliated retirement community. Posted 2021-09-29
John Schmidt thanks his classmates for their contributions to Class Notes. “Thanks for all of our pleasant exchanges and conversations over the years and for sharing so many of your life experiences with your classmates,” he says. Posted 2021-09-29
Burt Tregub had a very interesting and satisfying career, being in on some very early decisions developing the internet and earning a half-dozen patents in the field of cryptography. Posted 2021-02-26
Ed Stofka reports that he has recovered well from a stroke five years ago. “The only thing I lost is my whistle.” He and his wife, Sam, are sports fans, and for many years, worked for the Minnesota Twins during spring training in Florida. They recently took cruises in the Caribbean and are regular bridge players. “We played regularly with Larry Bloom and his wife before they moved to Connecticut to be near their son.” Posted 2021-02-26
Ron Smith is still an active scuba diver and is looking forward to his next trip to the reefs of the South Pacific. Seven years ago, he sold his 17-foot racing sailboat, marking the end of 44 years of racing at major regattas all over the country. A jogger until his knee replacement, Ron works out regularly on ellipticals and treadmills at a fitness center. Posted 2021-02-26
Though he’s given up golf, Herb Schaeffer gets out for walks and is active in the stock market. He and his wife, Rita, live in New Canaan, Conn. Herb keeps in touch with Steve Whitman, George McBride, and Ray Hofker. Posted 2021-02-26
After a career at Mobil, which included three years in Saudi Arabia, Joe Pilaro retired in 1994 from corporate planning. He used his MBA background to start an investment advisory company and, among other things, helped set up a network of brew pubs in New Jersey. Posted 2021-02-26
Don Peterson has recovered well after a recent angioplasty stent procedure and is in pretty good health. He has reluctantly had to give up golf, a major activity since his days on the RPI golf team. Don and his wife, Shirley, continue to enjoy their lives in Tucson. Posted 2021-02-26
John Magadini still coaches and teaches at the Pingry School in New Jersey. After a long and successful career as their head hockey coach, he continues as head coach emeritus. “Just being around the kids is a treat. They call me Mags.” He recently had to start teaching online and keeps in touch with Steve Whitman, his former roommate. Posted 2021-02-26
Ray Hofker does some legal work. He had a large case against a chemical company that lasted 10 years, slowed by politics between the U.S. and China. Ray recalls arriving at RPI “with my Samsonite piece of luggage, which housed my first suit. My parents drove me to the Quadrangle and dropped me off. RPI was a societal learning pit for me. While I didn’t mature until much later, the experience was my foundation for personal growth. It was a long journey, and I appreciate every step of it.” Posted 2021-02-26
Jim  Hoffman still lives on his 120-acre farm near Lake Ontario, and leases it out for field crops. “I have a huge garden and a huge yard. My wife and I were urban people, and we enjoy the space.” After 30 years of service, he retired from his local Planning Board but remains deeply active in his church. He also works to oppose installation of wind turbines nearby.  Posted 2021-02-26
Engineering John Schmidt writes: Happy anniversary. Let’s get back for our 65th Reunion! Marcia and I moved to a retirement home near Princeton, N.J., in September — a path many of us have taken by now.  Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering Barnett “Barney” Behrenfeld reports that he has arthritis and takes physical therapy twice a week but is not yet ready to move to a retirement home. “My neighborhood has turned over many times, and I like to see the young people. It always makes me feel good.” He and his wife can still drive and get around, but they have hired help for gardening and cleaning. Both their children live nearby, which also helps. Barney still keeps in regular contact with Bill Barbash. Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering Constantine Bassilakis worked for GE on aircraft engines and then had his own business consulting on gas turbines for the government and GE. He now works out at the Andover, Mass., YMCA two or three times a week. Connie also enjoys league bowling, bass fishing at his son’s camp in Maine, rooting for the NE Patriots, and dancing at least once a month. “I just dance the fast ones. I don’t enjoy slow dances.” Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering In July, Phil Carroll organized a mini-reunion in Santa Barbara with Willy Lick and Joan and Ron Smith. Rick Setlowe got sick at the last minute and couldn’t attend. “We enjoyed continuous recollections of the old days, starting with lunch at a great beachside café, through a tour of UCSB (where Willy taught), and a long evening at his beautiful house in the foothills, including catered dinner and viewing of his paintings. I bought one of his paintings, and it’s nice to see it every day.” In November Willy had an exhibition of his paintings at a Santa Barbara gallery. See www.paintingsbywilly.com. Posted 2020-05-18
Ilmars “Herb” Dambergs wrote with a great life story. “I came to this wonderful country as a Latvian displaced person in March 1950. In the fall of 1951, after eagerly requesting admission to the ROTC program at RPI, I was informed that I was not eligible by not being a citizen. The sergeant who told me that was wrong, but I had to accept his word. Instead of ROTC, RPI required me to take Chemistry 101. Well, my mind, lack of good high school preparation, my English, whatever, did not produce. Dr. Faigenbaum gave me a fat “F.” In my junior year I was required to repeat the failed subject. Although I was hoping for a D-minus, the professor was relentless and flunked me again. In the spring of 1954 RPI put me on probation; there was a possibility of getting drafted, and things looked bleak. Not even telling my parents, I visited the Army recruiting station, passed the requirements, and in May 1956 became an Infantry 2nd Lieutenant. The Army allowed me to obtain my baccalaureate degree and later a master’s in systems management. After nearly 30 years of service I retired in 1984. I belong to several veterans’ professional organizations. Last year the U.S. Army Officer Candidate School Alumni Association inducted me into the OCS Hall of Fame.” Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering Bob Hirshson had a career with Douglas Aircraft and Hughes Aircraft, eventually as manager of software development. No longer skiing or doing as much photography, he still keeps up with the computer world, especially for entertainment options. He and his wife have lived in their large house for 44 years but are not yet ready to downsize. Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering A former Air Force pilot, George Lamb has for many years built and flown radio-controlled model planes. He still builds models but no longer flies them. “My latest project is to divest myself of all my models.” Flying them had become increasingly difficult. “They get up high, about 2,000 feet, and you can’t see them. I don’t like to look into the sun.” Previously George had been filming some of his flights and entering the filmed results into international competitions. He and his wife have cut back on travel but still enjoy reading, walking, and visiting their grandchildren. Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering David Levine had a 34-year career at Sperry Rand/Unisys, then two five-year post-retirement jobs, first assembling and warehousing medical supplies and then in furniture and high-end gift shops. He reminisced about RPI days, when as president of Kappa Nu fraternity he doubled the house size and built a party room and bar. “It’s still there. My wife and I visited two years ago with all seven of our grandchildren and took photos at the bar. It’s now an RPI sorority house, and it’s immaculate. They were great — bused us to a hockey game and back. We also visited some of the joints we used to go to on 15th Street.” Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering John Lukacz reports that he is in good health and playing golf regularly. He and his wife drive regularly from Massachusetts to Maryland to visit their daughter’s family, including watching the games of three grandsons who are excelling in high school football and lacrosse. Their son also visits from San Diego. John hopes to attend our 65th Reunion. Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering Jerry Pollock moved to Florida 50 years ago to be near his parents and brother and sister. He reports that he has recovered well after fracturing four ribs last year. With two knee replacements, he doesn’t walk as far these days but gets to the gym to work out and swim. But with heavier knees, “I couldn’t keep my feet up.” In his Navy days Jerry made 21 crossings of the Atlantic and grew to love the sea. He and Jean live close to Ft. Lauderdale and have taken 77 cruises. “It’s so convenient.” Posted 2020-05-18
Engineering Steve Whitman has given up his house in New Jersey, and he and Janet now divide their time between homes in Connecticut and Texas. “But economic conditions in Connecticut are no better than in New Jersey. They kept raising the taxes on GE until GE left the state. The irony was that GE sold the land to a nonprofit, the Catholic Church.” Steve keeps up with the business world, including ties to AI research at Caltech, but says he doesn’t do much anymore. “I keep a black suit in each house and go to weddings and funerals.” Posted 2020-05-18
Chase (“Sal”) Adams said 10 years ago: “I’m never going to retire,” and he has kept his word. He no longer has his law practice but still runs a life insurance agency. With a current focus on gift planning strategies, Sal has developed a financial formula aimed at generating income for charities. The Adamses moved a few years ago from Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., to Sioux City, Iowa, to be near his wife’s mother. “It’s a much smaller town, only three flights a day from the airport. I sit at my desk and I work, as there is nothing else to do.” Sal has four sons living across the country.  Posted 2019-10-10
Engineering Richard Anderson still volunteers to help maintain portions of the Erie Canal. Drawing on his ChemE background, he recently helped select cement for a hard-to-patch canal aqueduct. Richard’s wife died two years ago. “I was married to a really tremendous lady. She received a letter from President Obama thanking her for her contribution to early childhood education.” When one of their sons lost his hearing at age 3, they went back to college and worked to set up appropriate education programs. Their son was able not only to succeed academically but also to go on to help develop the 911 network and the EZ-Pass system. Richard now works out five days a week at a Silver Sneakers aquatic exercise program.  Posted 2019-10-10
Like the rest of us, Charles Coe has had to cut back on his sports activities. “I used to play tennis but lost my partners and had to give it up. I skied until I was 71. They had super senior rates at the lift line. But I took a spill and had a compression fracture in my back, and gave that up.” Chuck is still a lap swimmer at a local outdoor pool. He and Judy enjoy theater, symphony, and lecture programs in Los Gatos, Calif.  Posted 2019-10-10
Clifford Hastings reports that he does a lot of reading and is a longtime volunteer manning the desk at his local library. The Hastings have traveled widely, with cruises to Canada, Alaska, Hawaii, and from Spain to Florida. “We’ve spent the last few years on the water.” They just gave up their annual visits to Nantucket because the terrain became too difficult for walking. Cliff has also given up golf. “My social life revolves around my physicians.”  Posted 2019-10-10
Edward Kaiser moved from Arkansas to near Dallas, Texas, several years ago to be near his children and grandchildren. Still an avid gardener, he found that he had to change some crops: Texas was too dry for mushrooms and a wrong pH for blueberries, but he now does well with two growing seasons and other crops including boysenberries, spinach, and kale. “We also used to hunt and fish, but we got old.” Ed traveled widely during his 39 years with Bell Helicopter/Textron but no longer wants to: “I got burned out then on planes. Now I hate to get on one — too cramped.” Also in the past are brewing his own beer and making wine: “I could buy better wine than I could make.”  Posted 2019-10-10
Neil Krebs recalls that he took almost no liberal arts courses at RPI, partly because of ROTC requirements. But after Army service in Korea he returned to RPI for his Ph.D. and developed a love of classical music, twice winning radio station contests to be the first to identify pieces. “I rushed to the post office to mail my entries. The prizes were tickets to concerts at the Field House. One was by the Mantovani Orchestra.” He lives in Stephentown, N.Y., where his wife, a descendant of Stephen Douglas, has a 300-acre property dating back to the Douglas family in 1765. Neil and his wife keep very busy raising Scottie Terriers, llamas, alpacas, chickens, and ducks.  Posted 2019-10-10
Daniel Murphy reports that he and his wife are fine. He walks a mile and a half most every day. Dan used to race sailboats on a large lake nearby but has given that up. He has a lifetime love of sports cars, having raced in the ’50s “until I got married and couldn’t afford it.” Now the owner of two Alfa Romeos, he drives regularly around the countryside with a group of owners from the St. Louis area. Lacking power steering “does wear out my arms.” Dan works on the cars himself, with the 1961 model now taken apart for new wiring. “Surprisingly, parts are easier to get now than 20 years ago.” Dan visited RPI in 2013 for the renewal of his DKE fraternity.  Posted 2019-10-10
Shelby Putnam reports that he and his wife are “doing reasonably well.” In past years they sailed their trawler on summer trips from Maine to the Florida Keys and Bahamas, but they have given that up. They also recently gave up their summer house on Chebeague Island near Portland. “Things got a little heavier than they used to be.” Shelby sold his candy manufacturing business in 1992 but still goes in part time, several owners later, taking care of the machinery.  Posted 2019-10-10
Engineering In what may be a class record, Arthur Rathbun worked full time with the same company, Bettis, for 58 years. Getting his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering along the way, he designed nuclear reactors for the U.S. Navy’s submarines and carriers. Since retiring at age 81 he has had to give up skiing but keeps busy with cruises, visits to his children in California and France, and numerous trips with Road Scholar’s Signature Cities program.  Posted 2019-10-10
Harvey Rosenhouse still gets around well, driving regularly from New Jersey to visit his sons, a math professor in Virginia and a lawyer in Brooklyn. He and Sandy had a recent family vacation at Disney World. “Surprisingly, I enjoyed it. My grandchildren persuaded me to go on the roller coaster. I hadn’t been on one for 30 years. Once every 30 years is enough.” Harvey works out at home with dumbbells and push-ups — “at least I call them push-ups.” He keeps in touch with Rajai Atalla, who according to Harvey is still running a research laboratory.  Posted 2019-10-10
Norman Schwartz earned a law degree and practiced real estate law in California for 30 years. An avid pilot since RPI days, he has flown around the world, over the North Pole, and across Africa bush country. He had to sell his plane and give up flying several years ago: “The insurance companies are prejudiced against people over 80. I’ve adopted a more passive hobby, photography. Street photography has become a passionate hobby.” Norman has received several awards, and his works hang in local galleries and have been featured in publications including the cover of the UCLA extension course catalog. His portfolio website is www.nsapc.com/run.  Posted 2019-10-10
Playing tennis three times a week keeps Brooks Vogt in shape. “But getting up at 7:30 is no fun. And the game is slowing down. People don’t remember who is serving.” Brooks is nostalgic about his former days in a motorcycle group. “We were known as the Del Monte Vultures. We rode all over the place. Riding in a group is fun. Riding solo is scary — too many people don’t see you.” The Vogts keep busy tracking their three grandsons: a 17-year-old playing goalie in an elite hockey league (and thinking about attending RPI), a 15-year-old playing football and hockey, and a 9-year-old who has recovered from cancer and who now appears on TV as an ambassador for his children’s hospital in Los Angeles.  Posted 2019-10-10
When I spoke in October with Gordon (Russ) Wilmot, he was getting ready to turn his four-bedroom house over to his son and move to a nearby apartment. “We built the house, and I have 55 years worth of stuff to get rid of.” A lifetime amateur clarinetist with local orchestras and bands, he stopped playing recently to become a full-time caregiver for his wife. “Once we get settled, I might pick it up again.” Posted 2019-03-10
Ted Sargent has a third generation at RPI. Both his son and son-in-law attended, and his granddaughter is now a freshman. “She loves the campus and the people she’s met.” Posted 2019-03-10
Pete Nicholson earned an M.S. at Cornell and then worked at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, where he founded and developed a satellite ground facility, earning two Meritorious Civilian Service Awards. He had a second career at the Department of Defense working on satellite communications for troops in the field, finally retiring two years ago. Pete keeps active by maintaining the family homestead in Maryland and reminiscing with lasting friends from work. He remembers his RPI roommate Spiro Pappas and Professors Spiegel, Guilford, and Weaver, who were most influential during his academic life. He and Beth have two children, including a son who is emergency backup goalie for the Washington Capitals, and a grandson who they think is heading for engineering, perhaps at RPI. Posted 2019-03-10
George McBride reports that he is still enjoying life despite some back problems. “I walk around the block, and I can still drive. I do a lot of reading, including biographies of all of the U.S. presidents through Lincoln.” Growing up in the Detroit area made him a lifelong Lions fan, and in October he and Nan drove there from Maryland to see a game, joining their children for a family reunion. They also met with Steve Whitman and Herb Schaeffer and their wives for the group’s annual production of pickles, canning about 80 jars. Steve now has residences in Connecticut and Texas, the latter near his children. Posted 2019-03-10
Lois and Sal Magnano moved to a retirement community in Nashua, N.H., five years ago. “We get fed very nicely.” Sal serves on the facility’s resident council and on its board of trustees. He has also served on the board of Nashua’s Boys and Girls Club for an incredible 36 years. “Our major task is raising money. The club serves about 500 kids each day.” Lois has been slowed by arthritis, but Sal still works out on the treadmill and enjoys walking. Posted 2019-03-10
Prof. Willy Lick continues to spend much of his time painting, turning out many lovely works in oil. He exhibits at galleries in Santa Barbara. “I get lots of compliments but few sales. I mainly do it because I enjoy painting. It’s a learning process. I never had art classes.” He does a painting of his granddaughter at least once every year. “It’s sort of a record.” Willy still consults for the government on environmental problems, mostly for the EPA. In the past he and his students worked extensively on pollution of the Hudson River by PCBs, modeling sediment transport, chemical absorption by sediments, effects of storms, etc. Posted 2019-03-10
Stephen Jaff has lived in NYC all his life, currently in a condo he bought 20 years ago. “I couldn’t afford it now.” When we spoke in October, the Jaffs had just returned from three weeks in Paris and were planning a similar trip to London in March—“God willing, and if we get the bathroom renovated.” He was also looking forward to seeing the latest Harry Potter film, after he and his wife took turns reading a Potter book to each other: “I’ve not completely gotten the boy out of me.” The Jaffs are active attendees at concerts, theater, and lectures. Another favorite is the Met Opera HD series, performed in a nearby theater whose entire interior was rebuilt by Stephen years ago when he operated his family’s interior renovation business. The Jaffs have two daughters, both in Manhattan. “I wish them well, and I wish they’d get married.” Posted 2019-03-10
Age has slowed Ronald Harris, but not much. After retirement from MIT, he and his wife bought a 17-acre property near Saranac Lake in the Adirondacks. “It’s a lot of work, and a lot to maintain.” He has stopped rock climbing but still hikes, climbs slopes, and skis. Until his wife’s death two years ago they traveled widely around the western U.S. and Alaska, including a visit with Chuck Parker in Arizona. They towed a jeep behind their motor home, for exploring off-road trails. Posted 2019-03-10
Joel Feinberg says he is in pretty good health, still drives, and works out at the gym. He lives alone and is getting ready to sell his house and downsize. His second wife died four years ago, and he has a new girlfriend. “I’ve pretty much given up things I used to do, like collecting cameras and raising fish.” In earlier years Joel taught computer services for senior citizens, led discussion groups for seniors at Iona College, and was a master gardener. Posted 2019-03-10
Phil Carroll registered to run another Detroit full marathon in October but had to skip it when he didn’t have enough time to train. “I figure I could have walked it in 10 hours. But the finish line stays open for only six and a half. My worst finish has been 6:25.”

He has run more than 60 full marathons and hopes to run another this year. Ann Arbor has no central park, and Phil is busy campaigning to convert a parking area to a park rather than a high-rise. He is not yet ready to downsize, but, “I have a 10-year plan to continually reduce the amount of stuff in the house.”
Posted 2019-03-10
Prof. Eugene Byrnes earned his Ph.D. at the U. of New Hampshire and taught organic chemistry at Assumption College in Worcester. After retirement, “I like to get outside of chemistry and do many other things.” In the past he has been very active in his church and helping elderly and infirm neighbors, but now has had to stick closer to home. “Mostly I am taking care of my wife. She needs help, and I need help remembering.” Posted 2019-03-10
Ernest Berger spent three years in the Navy and then joined his father’s firm, designing kitchens and selling appliances. He recently retired, has much more free time, and has started to work out with a personal trainer. A bachelor, he lives with his sister. Posted 2019-03-10
Dr. Marvin Warshay died in July after battling pancreatic cancer and Parkinson’s disease. He had retired after 36 years with NASA in Cleveland, having served as chief of their Electrochemical Technology Branch, leading the development of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants, and receiving their Exceptional Service Award. He then worked for 14 years as a consultant to the fuel cell industry. He authored/co-authored over 40 technical reports on advanced energy production and conversion. Posted 2018-10-10
Allen Seckner has been dealing with Parkinson’s disease for 10 years. After a couple of falls he had to give up golf and recently driving, but enjoys playing bridge several times a week. “My wife got sensitive about my driving.” A career DuPonter, Al reports that fellow retirees formed a committee out of concerns that the recent DuPont-Dow merger might affect retiree benefits, but the outcome looks quite favorable. Posted 2018-10-10
Science A new University of Massachusetts building has been named for former U.S. Congressman John Olver. The $52 million, 87,000-square-foot facility houses architecture, building construction, and regional planning programs. Initially it was set to be built with the more common steel and concrete construction materials, but at John’s urging it was built with more environmentally friendly laminated wood, cross-laminated timber, and wood-concrete composite. It is the largest modern wood building in the Northeast and saves the equivalent of over 2,300 metric tons of carbon compared to a traditional energy-intensive steel and concrete building. John taught chemistry at UMass before being elected a state legislator. He was first elected to Congress in 1991 and retired in 2013. Posted 2018-10-10
Dick Maher says he is NQR — not quite retired. After the Marine Corps and a Stanford MBA he spent most of his career in the wine industry. He has served as president of Beringer Vineyards, the Seagram Wine Co., Christian Brothers Winery, and Heublein Fine Wines, as well as chairman of the California Wine Institute and president of the Napa Valley Vintners Association. “I got fired every 20 years.” He still serves on several boards, consults for the wine industry, and consults in real estate with one of his sons. Three of his five children live nearby. Dick has a tennis court in his yard but can no longer play, after knee and shoulder injuries. The wine business involved frequent travel, and after his first wife’s death 10 years ago he met his second wife on a trip to Hawaii. We are grateful to Dick for his many donations of fine wines for our class reunions. Posted 2018-10-10
Business Joe Keating is delighted that his granddaughter is a student at RPI, studying business. “The first assignment was to start her own business. The second was to help Fitbit stabilize their business. They were interviewed by a Fitbit board member who is an RPI alumnus. When we were at RPI we just fooled around the first year.” The Keatings recently moved to a retirement village in Lancaster, Pa. “Between doctor visits and 16 grandchildren, we keep busy.” Joe plays in a harmonica trio to entertain assisted living residents and plays a weekly round of golf with his son, a priest. His wife stopped him from playing racquetball, but he still plays pickleball and competes in senior games including ping pong and mile walking. A cross country runner at RPI, Joe still stays in touch with the RPI team and contributes to their support. Posted 2018-10-10
When I talked with Franchard (“Mike”) Clarke in April he was about to celebrate his 86th birthday. The Clarkes have seven children, three adopted, and 10 grandchildren, and have served as foster parents for more than 50 children. Recently Mike has been a caregiver: “My wife had a heart attack, and I’ve had a lot on my plate.” He visits with his grandchildren, does some yard work, and continues to be active in his church. Posted 2018-10-10
After RPI, Frank Chiarelli played professional hockey for five years, then decided that it was time to settle down. He studied at the U. of Toronto to qualify as a teacher and then taught math, history, and Italian for 25 years. “I had two opportunities to get into the business of hockey and after careful consideration I rejected both. Each would have required me to be an absent parent and I was not prepared to do that. I made the right decision each time.” Frank did other things as well. For years his family operated a road building business where he learned about heavy construction equipment and how to operate it. He and his four brothers built a golf and country club and then, on his own, Frank built and operated three golf courses. “The golf operation became too much and I had to leave teaching. I would have preferred not to.”

Frank reports that he is in pretty good shape at age 87. “My wife pushes me to go out and walk.” He has sold the golf courses and become an author. After writing some technical papers on golf he has written five full-length books—three about hockey, two not—and is working on a sixth. They can be acquired through Amazon. “I sit in a La-Z-Boy chair. When the thoughts come I put them down. When there are no thoughts there is no production.” The Chiarellis have two sons and two daughters. Both boys are in the business of hockey. Peter was hockey captain at Harvard, became GM of the Boston Bruins when they won the Stanley Cup in 2011, and is now GM of the Edmonton Oilers. Michael was a scout with the Bruins and is now with the Oilers. Frank reminisced about the immigrant experience: “I had two older brothers born in Italy. My father came to Canada and brought the family over five years later. I was the first born in Canada and later was much involved in my father’s five businesses.” Frank keeps in touch with his remaining teammates from RPI’s 1954 national championship hockey team, including Lloyd Bauer and John Magadini.
Posted 2018-10-10
Tom Bolam and Sally were in Alaska when Hurricane Harvey struck Houston in August 2017. “The Corps of Engineers had to open their dam, flooding thousands of us. We had four feet of water in our house and could not get into it for three weeks. The entire downstairs had to be rebuilt.” Fortunately, they had flood insurance. Many in their community did not, and some houses were torn down. Mail delivery stopped, and a major frustration was having to go to their post office, which serves a half million people, standing in line, ringing a bell, and waiting for someone to go back and look. The Bolams are considering selling and consolidating life in their other house in NY state, but probably won’t be able to sell until their Houston community is further restored. Meanwhile Tom and Sally, avid golfers, hadn’t played for more than eight months. He expects to keep shooting his age: “It’s getting easier.” Posted 2018-10-10
Dr. Marvin Warshay died in July after battling pancreatic cancer and Parkinson’s disease. He had retired after 36 years with NASA in Cleveland, having served as chief of their Electrochemical Technology Branch, leading the development of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants, and receiving their Exceptional Service Award. Marvin, who then worked for 14 years as a consultant to the fuel cell industry, also authored/co-authored over 40 technical reports on advanced energy production and conversion.  Posted 2018-03-15
Paul Vinett, who played on the RPI baseball team along with Frank Chiarelli and Abby Moore, still enjoys telling people that he played with two All-Americans. Paul recalls: "After the 'Wow!' comments, I tell them they were hockey All-Americans on the RPI NCAA '54 championship team. Those hockey games were the greatest. I played the drum in the Pep Band, and we sat on the center line with our girlfriends (my wife).” In a 40-year career with Central Hudson Gas & Electric, Paul served in several management positions, and on national committees dealing with power system protection. Paul, who has been battling melanoma since 2012, says: “Thank God I was able to get into a clinical trial at Sloan Kettering. They saved my life.” Posted 2018-03-15
Charles Viens, who had a career in the petroleum industry, has lived in a retirement home in South Hadley, Mass., for 19 years, having moved there when his late wife suffered from ALS. Charles was an avid golfer until suffering from a bout of pneumonia in December 2016.; Charles says: “I’m still on oxygen; I don’t know if I’ll ever get off. My golfing buddies have gotten me to go out with them once a week, sitting in a cart, but not swinging a club. It’s certainly changed my lifestyle. I used to go to lots of concerts and activities.” Charles feels that entering the retirement home has been the right move for him, observing, “I think a lot of people wait too long. They have been very helpful here in my rehab.” Posted 2018-03-15
Bob Tewell died in February 2017 after bouts with leukemia and prostate cancer. Bob had taught courses in electrical engineering and control systems at RPI for eight years before a 32-year career at Lockheed Martin, where he worked with astronauts on the Gemini and Apollo programs. Posted 2018-03-15
Irving Paris still works in his architectural practice —“whatever comes in the door,” he says.  Irving does mostly forensic work, which requires keeping up with many changes in building codes, but fortunately, these are listed on the internet. Irving also tends his two-acre lawn; “I try to sit on the mower,” he quips.  Irving and Myrna were preparing for a Mediterranean cruise last fall, and they also enjoy reading; as Irving puts it: “We can buy used books for a dollar, read them, and pass them along to friends.” Posted 2018-03-15
Winslow Oakes had a Navy career that included service in the Vietnam War; after the war, he and his wife Fran worked for more than 30 years as independent distributors of Christian books along the West Coast and in Hawaii. The business went by the wayside after the 2008 downturn decimated private Christian schools, but Win and Fran continued to collect and distribute books on a volunteer basis. “It used to be a business ministry, but the back end has also been good," adds Win, who also reworks jewelry into Christian forms and donates it. Fran died three years ago, so Win now lives with his daughter, son, and granddaughter. “I’m in fairly good health and taking care of myself," he says. "I am well cared for and well distracted.” Posted 2018-03-15
Fred Mussler has moved from Florida to North Carolina to be near his son and daughter. In addition to staying active as a business broker, playing some golf, and reading history, Fred also paints in oil and watercolors and has exchanged works with another class painter, Willy Lick. He also alternates running and walking, saying, “I have trouble with my hip but I keep doing it anyway.” Fred and Becky have raised their grandson, Chase, and acted as his legal guardians until he turned 18 last fall. Posted 2018-03-15
John Lukacz no longer works as a starter at his golf course, but he still plays golf three or four times a week and works out at a health-care center. Except for visiting their son in San Diego and their daughter in Maryland, he and his wife no longer travel much. “I did my traveling in the Navy,” he explains. Posted 2018-03-15
Berdj Kalustyan was a serial entrepreneur, founding half a dozen businesses in diagnostic management, computer leasing, chiropractic, hospital exercise equipment, and a computer maintenance company with offices in 50 states. He retired 10 years ago, stating, “I’ve sold my businesses and downsized everything including my health. I’m just trying to stay alive. I’ve had 17 operations in 20 years.” He and his wife Alice sold their house on the New Jersey shore and now divide their time between Palm Beach, Fla., and downsized quarters in central NJ. Berdj keeps busy tracking investments, noting, “I spend half the day in front of the computer and half the day doing whatever my wife tells me to do.” Posted 2018-03-15
Bill Headden lives on two golf courses, one in Washington and one in Arizona. He usually plays regularly, often with his wife, but has lately been sidelined with a detached retina. According to Bill: “It’s like looking through a fish bowl. It pretty much guarantees that you won’t be doing much for six months.” Their life in the San Juan Islands is ideal for boating, and Bill recently replaced his sailboat with a motor craft that sleeps two. “I’ve had a lot of boats,” he adds. Bill also keeps busy with gardening, yard work, and reading. Posted 2018-03-15
Bill Barbash and his wife Susan recently moved to a retirement home in New Paltz, N.Y., and are enjoying their new lifestyle. “It reduces isolation,” he observes.  Bill continues his longtime practice of taking courses at the Marist College Center for Lifetime Study, and also works at getting some regular physical exercise. Posted 2018-03-15
Paul Vinett writes: “I played on the RPI baseball team, along with Frank Chiarelli and Abby Moore. I still enjoy telling people that I played with two All-Americans. After “Wow!” comments I tell them they were hockey All-Americans on the RPI NCAA ’54 championship team. Those hockey games were the greatest. I played the drum in the Pep Band, and we sat on the center line with our girlfriends (my wife).” In a 40-year career with Central Hudson Gas & Electric, Paul served in several management positions and on national committees dealing with power system protection. He has been battling melanoma since 2012. “Thank God I was able to get into a clinical trial at Sloan Kettering. They saved my life.” Posted 2018-03-10
After a career in the petroleum industry Charles Viens has lived in a retirement home in South Hadley, Mass., for 19 years, having moved there when his late wife suffered from ALS. He was an avid golfer until a bout of pneumonia in December 2016. “I’m still on oxygen; I don’t know if I’ll ever get off. My golfing buddies have gotten me to go out with them once a week, sitting in a cart, but not swinging a club. It’s certainly changed my lifestyle. I used to go to lots of concerts and activities.” He feels that entering the retirement home has been the right move for him. “I think a lot of people wait too long. They have been very helpful here in my rehab.” Posted 2018-03-10
I learned from his son that Bob Tewell died in February 2017 after bouts with leukemia and prostate cancer. Bob had taught courses in electrical engineering and control systems at RPI for eight years before a 32-year career at Lockheed Martin, where he worked with astronauts on the Gemini and Apollo programs. Posted 2018-03-10
Architecture Irving Paris still works in his architectural practice —“whatever comes in the door.” He does mostly forensic work, which requires keeping up with many changes in building codes. Fortunately, these are listed on the internet. He also tends his two-acre lawn: “I try to sit on the mower.” He and Myrna were preparing for a Mediterranean cruise when we spoke last fall. They also enjoy reading. “We can buy used books for a dollar, read them, and pass them along to friends.” Posted 2018-03-10
After a Navy career that included service in the Vietnam War, Winslow Oakes and his wife worked for more than 30 years as independent distributors of Christian books along the West Coast and in Hawaii. “The business went by the wayside after the 2008 downturn decimated private Christian schools.” They continued to collect and distribute books on a volunteer basis. “It used to be a business ministry, but the back end has also been good.” Win also reworks jewelry into Christian forms and donates it. His wife, Fran, died three years ago, and he now lives with his daughter, son, and granddaughter. “I’m in fairly good health and taking care of myself. I am well cared for and well distracted.” Posted 2018-03-10
Fred Mussler has moved from Florida to North Carolina to be near his son and daughter. He stays active as a business broker, plays some golf, and enjoys reading history. Fred also paints in oil and watercolors and has exchanged works with another class painter, Willy Lick. Another activity is alternating running and walking. “I have trouble with my hip but I keep doing it anyway.” Fred and Becky have raised their grandson, Chase, acting as legal guardians until he turned 18 last fall. Posted 2018-03-10
John Lukacz no longer works as a starter at his golf course, but he still plays golf three or four times a week and works out at a health-care center. Except for visits to their son in San Diego and their daughter in Maryland, he and his wife no longer travel much. “I did my traveling in the Navy.” John and I reminisced about many of our classmates, and he hopes to attend our 65th Reunion in 2020.  Posted 2018-03-10
Berdj Kalustyan was a serial entrepreneur, founding half a dozen businesses in diagnostic management, computer leasing, chiropractic, hospital exercise equipment, and a computer maintenance company with offices in 50 states. He retired 10 years ago. “I’ve sold my businesses and downsized everything including my health. I’m just trying to stay alive. I’ve had 17 operations in 20 years.” He and Alice sold their house on the New Jersey shore and now divide their time between Palm Beach, Fla., and downsized quarters in central NJ. Berdj keeps busy tracking investments. “I spend half the day in front of the computer and half the day doing whatever my wife tells me to do.” Posted 2018-03-10
Bill Headden lives on two golf courses, one in Washington and one in Arizona. He usually plays regularly, often with his wife, but has lately been sidelined with a detached retina. “It’s like looking through a fish bowl. It pretty much guarantees that you won’t be doing much for six months.” Their life in the San Juan Islands is ideal for boating, and Bill recently replaced his sailboat with a motor craft that sleeps two. “I’ve had a lot of boats.” He also keeps busy with gardening, yard work, and reading. Posted 2018-03-10
Susan and Bill Barbash moved recently to a retirement home in New Paltz, N.Y., and are enjoying their new lifestyle. “It reduces isolation.” Bill continues his longtime practice of taking courses at the Marist College Center for Lifetime Study. He also works at getting some regular physical exercise. Posted 2018-03-10